What is Respect in a Healthy Relationship?

“Respect in a relationship is reflected in how you treat each other on a daily basis.”

Love is respect

Note: The post What is Respect in a Healthy Relationship? appeared first on www.loveisrespect.org.

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People have a lot of different ideas about what the word “respect” means. Sometimes, it is used to mean admiration for someone important or inspirational to us. Other times, respect refers to deference towards a figure of authority, like a parent, relative, teacher, boss or even a police officer. In this context, it is presumed that respect should be given to those who have certain types of knowledge and power. And then other times, respect means upholding the basic right that every person has to make their own choices and feel safe in their own daily lives.

In this post, we’re talking about respect in the context of dating. In a healthy relationship, partners are equals, which means that neither partner has “authority” over the other. Each partner is free to live their own life, which can include deciding to share some aspects of their life with their partner. Respect also means that, while we may not always agree with our partner/s, we choose to trust them and put faith in their judgment. This trust can be built over time as your relationship progresses and you learn more about each other.

How Do You Show Respect in a Healthy Relationship?

Respect in a relationship is reflected in how you treat each other on a daily basis. Even if you disagree or have an argument (and arguments do happen, even in healthy relationships!), you are able to respect and value each other’s opinions and feelings by “fighting” fair. Respect isn’t about controlling someone or making them do what you want them to do. Respect is actually about the freedom to be yourself and to be loved for who you are.

In a healthy relationship, respect looks like:

Self-Respect

While it’s important to respect your partner in a relationship, it’s also really important to have respect for yourself, whether single or dating. Self-respect is the key to building confidence and maintaining healthy relationships with other people throughout your life.

So, what is self-respect? Self-respect is acceptance of yourself as a whole person. It doesn’t mean you think you’re perfect; in fact, we all deserve respect even though we are NOT perfect. You have worth and value just because you’re you. Self-respect means you hold yourself to your own standards, and you try not to worry too much about what other people think of you. You take care of your body and mind (or you’re learning how!), whether that’s through eating healthy foods, moving your body in ways that feel good to you, reading and learning, going to therapy, practicing your faith or any number of things that honor who you are.

Our theme for Teen DV Month is Love is…Respect, so check back throughout the month of February for more on what respect means (and what it doesn’t) in relationships!

Do you have questions about what’s healthy/not healthy in a relationship? Are you concerned that your partner doesn’t respect you? Call, chat or text with a loveisrespect advocate today and let’s talk it out.

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

Feb: Teen DV Awareness Month

This post first appeared on the website of the National Domestic Violence Hotline

Raise Awareness During Teen DV Month

Today [February 1, 2017] we’re kicking off Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month (Teen DV Month), a national effort to raise awareness about dating violence, which affects one in three adolescents in the U.S. At The Hotline, we believe that education is the key to preventing dating and domestic violence. You can help by talking to the young people in your life about what’s healthy and what’s not healthy in a relationship.
Our project for youth and young adults, loveisrespect, was the first national, 24-hour helpline for teens and young adults affected by dating violence. We are proud to be commemorating loveisrespect’s 10th anniversary this February! To help spread the message about healthy relationships, they’re getting back to basics with their Teen DV Month theme: Love is…Respect.

If you are a parent, student, educator or youth leader, we invite you to get involved and join loveisrespect during the month of February:

  • Feb. 8: “Love is Respect, Online and Off!” Twitter chat at 6:30 p.m. CT. Cohosted by That’s Not Cool! Follow #teendvchat to join.
  • Feb. 13-17: Respect Week! Download the Respect Week Guide on loveisrespect’s Teen DV Month page for event and activity ideas.
  • Feb. 14: On Valentine’s Day, we wear #orange4love! Let everyone know you’ll be wearing orange on the Facebook event page, and be sure to share your picture on social media!
  • Feb. 15: ”Let’s Talk About Respect + Sex, Baby” Twitter chat at 7 p.m. CT. Follow #teendvchat to join.
  • Feb. 17: National Respect Announcement. Join the Thunderclap and help spread the message that everyone deserves a healthy relationship!
  • Feb. 23: Join loveisrespect’s webinar, “Teens Helping Teens: Empowering Young People to Support Each Other” at 3:30 p.m. CT. During this webinar, aimed at adult allies (educators, parents, programs, organizations), they’ll be discussing tips and strategies for empowering young people to support one another. Register here.

And, don’t forget to follow loveisrespect on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr for updates and information to share with your friends and family!

 

Not all violence is physical

Women (and men) have all kinds of things said to them: sometimes with knowledge of and sometimes with ignorance of their violence.

 

Nevertheless she peersisted

Writer and artist Courtney Privett was reading the news on Wednesday as she prepared breakfast for her two daughters, 2 and 5 years old.

Like many around the country, she’d already learned how Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) cut off Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) as she tried to read a 1986 letter written by Coretta Scott King about Senator Jeff Sessions, who was nominated by President Donald Trump to serve as attorney general.

“Sen. Warren was giving a lengthy speech,” McConnell said later. “She had appeared to violate the rule. She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.”

It didn’t take long for those final two words to gain traction around the internet, becoming a rallying cry for all the women who had spent their lives being judged, objectified, condescended to, ignored, silenced, attacked and, yes, “warned.” Women who, nevertheless, persisted.

Read the entire post here