After an Abusive Relationship, Lily Collins is Putting Herself First

Rising from the ashes of a destructive relationship.

Self-care is paramount.

beg-quote-black-71by52Lily Collins has released her first book, a collection of essays titled Unfiltered. […] her essays are raw, reflective, and deeply personal.

Perhaps the best example of this is her decision to discuss a former relationship that she says was physically and emotionally abusive. Collins told Us Weekly that the choice to include that part of her life in the book wasn’t easy, but she hoped it would be illuminating for women in similar situations. […]

Collins also revealed that it’s been difficult for her to talk about this time in her life, because she used to blame herself for ending up in a toxic situation in the first place. “I never regretted it, but I felt ashamed,” she said. “I thought, How could I put myself in that position? I came to a deeper understanding as I was writing. It’s taking the shame out of those things that makes you stronger.” […] “My book #Unfiltered is not about the other people in my life, but instead what I’ve learned about myself along the way,” she wrote in her caption. “It’s not about vilifying anyone. It’s about sharing my experiences to hopefully help others.”end-quote-black-71by52

Source: After an Abusive Relationship, Lily Collins is Putting Herself First

Getting the Dating Violence Conversation Started

How one group of concerned adults got the teen dating violence conversation started.

Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

This article presents one way to begin a conversation with teens and pre-teens about relationships, respect, and warning signs of an abusive relationship.

Junior High kids talk ‘Teen Dating Violence’ at Cody CDC” was originally posted on Pentagram

beg-quote-black-71by52What is one way to get teenagers to talk about an important issue like relationship abuse and sexting for Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month?

Show them a prominent crime show on YouTube about a fictional character who experiences real-life trauma and then discuss it.

For February, Army Community Service Family Advocacy program victim advocate and School Age Services leader, Jalessa Robinson, showed seven students Law & Order: Special Victims Units (SVU) Feb. 10 at The Cody Child Development Center. This particular show was about a female high school student who was in an abusive relationship, one that almost killed her.

“Kids are being exposed to things younger and younger these days,”said Lindsay Seals, a domestic abuse victim advocate at Fort Myer; Seals led a round-table discussion with the students after the show. “The hope was to start with the younger teens so that we could educate them on teen abuse [in order] that they might be aware of what [abuse looks like] — because it can be hard to identify.”

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